There will be signs in the sky this year starting real soon. . .

comments (0) February 7th, 2013

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I took the picture on Jan. 23rd using a 41 cm (16 in) Meade reflector, says Drummond. It is a stack of twenty 1 minute exposures. That much time was required for a good view of the comets approximately 7th-magnitude coma (coma=cloud of gas surrounding the comets nucleus).
Lemmons green color comes from the gases that make up its coma. Jets spewing from the comets nucleus contain cyanogen (CN: a poisonous gas found in many comets) and diatomic carbon (C2). Both substances glow green when illuminated by sunlight in the near-vacuum of space.
Discovered on March 23rd 2012 by the Mount Lemmon survey in Arizona, Comet Lemmon is on an elliptical orbit with a period of almost 11,000 years. This is its first visit to the inner solar system in a very long time. The comet is brightening as it approaches the sun; light curves suggest that it will reach 2nd or 3rd magnitude, similar to the stars in the Big Dipper, in late March when it approaches the sun at about the same distance as Venus (0.7 AU). Northern hemisphere observers will get their first good look at the comet in early April; until then it is a target exclusively for astronomers in the southern hemisphere.Click To Enlarge

"I took the picture on Jan. 23rd using a 41 cm (16 in) Meade reflector," says Drummond. "It is a stack of twenty 1 minute exposures." That much time was required for a good view of the comet's approximately 7th-magnitude coma ("coma"=cloud of gas surrounding the comet's nucleus).

Lemmon's green color comes from the gases that make up its coma. Jets spewing from the comet's nucleus contain cyanogen (CN: a poisonous gas found in many comets) and diatomic carbon (C2). Both substances glow green when illuminated by sunlight in the near-vacuum of space.

Discovered on March 23rd 2012 by the Mount Lemmon survey in Arizona, Comet Lemmon is on an elliptical orbit with a period of almost 11,000 years. This is its first visit to the inner solar system in a very long time. The comet is brightening as it approaches the sun; light curves suggest that it will reach 2nd or 3rd magnitude, similar to the stars in the Big Dipper, in late March when it approaches the sun at about the same distance as Venus (0.7 AU). Northern hemisphere observers will get their first good look at the comet in early April; until then it is a target exclusively for astronomers in the southern hemisphere.

Photo: John Drummond

I wanted to snip a little piece from one of my dad's blog posts about the coming comets and asteroid. You need to visit his blog to get the whole story: http://blog.magiclandfarms.com/?p=490. I found it quite interesting and something to keep in mind now and in the coming days. Grab some photos if you can and share!

Things are really starting to hop out there in the sky-things you might not even have to wait until dark to see…

First off, you may have heard about the Great Comet ISON which, come fall, may be a startlingly bright comet that you won't have to wait until night to see.  It is possible that it will even brighten up the sky on a bright sunny day!  At night, it just may light up the landscape so much you will think that, if you are out in the boonies on a clear night, there is an extraordinarily bright full moon out–at least until you look up at the sky and see the comet!

Also coming up in March keep a look for the Comet Pan-STARRS since it is expected to become visible to the naked eye at night.

And then right now the Green Comet, also called Comet Lemmon, is already visible in the southern hemisphere (South America, Australia, Southern Africa) and we will be able to see it . . . (read the rest here: http://blog.magiclandfarms.com/?p=490)

 


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