How to Grow Bell Peppers

comments (16) August 5th, 2008

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If rainbow colors are your thing, plant some bell peppers. You can get a color burst of peppers from one variety. Islander is a chameleon, turning green, yellow, purple, orange, and red.
A two-level trellis supports pepper plants. Lines at the base brace main stems, while the upper zigzag helps bushy higher growth.
Elisa is an elongated, four-lobed red bell pepper with good disease resistance and continuous fruit set.
If rainbow colors are your thing, plant some bell peppers. You can get a color burst of peppers from one variety. Islander is a chameleon, turning green, yellow, purple, orange, and red.Click To Enlarge

If rainbow colors are your thing, plant some bell peppers. You can get a color burst of peppers from one variety. 'Islander' is a chameleon, turning green, yellow, purple, orange, and red.

Photo: Boyd Hagen

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Finally, a peck of peppers to pick

  Sources for bell pepper seeds:

Johnny’s Selected Seeds
955 Benton Avenue
Winslow, ME 04901
877-564-6697
www.johnnysseeds.com

Tomato Growers Supply
PO Box 60015
Fort Myers, FL 33906
www.tomatogrowers.com
   

Fifty to 60 days after transplanting, we begin picking peppers. The thin-walled ‘Cubanelle’ and purple bells always come the earliest, followed quickly by the first green bells. We pick once a week and plan on at least one or two peppers per plant each week all the way to frost. For the colored sweet bells, we go ahead and pick the first peppers green and low on the plant, since experience has taught us that fruit rot invades if we let them go to color. This early harvest also keeps the plants setting fruit for later harvest. For the first two or three weeks we pick the “crown set,” the first pepper produced at the first fork in the plant, then move up the plant and thin the fruits so they are not touching and have good air flow around them.

By August 1, we stop picking the immature green peppers and wait for them to turn their vibrant colors. Let a pepper go to its full color and the texture is smoother and the sugars really develop.

By the end of August, the insect pressure decreases, the weather is drier, and the sweet, colored fruit ripens with fewer defects. For almost the next two months, there’s a weekly harvest. The curtain falls with the first hard freeze. Then we start looking forward to the next season, when we will again walk through the garden in search of the perfect sweet pepper.

 Bell pepper recipes 
Mussels with Sweet Peppers   Creamy Red Pepper Grits   Pickled Pepper Relish
Mussels with Sweet Peppers   Creamy Red Pepper Grits   Pickled Pepper Relish


by Alex Hitt
June 1997
from issue #9

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posted in: peppers

Comments (16)

DaniloHawk writes: Really nice
Posted: 2:34 am on October 8th
Dallinlarsen555 writes: creative
Posted: 12:51 pm on October 6th
matthewtweedie writes: very beautiful
Posted: 12:08 am on September 30th
Blaizesampson writes: Colourful article
Posted: 3:23 am on July 30th
JardaeKeeley writes: Looks really tasty and sweet
Posted: 12:08 am on May 14th
Falimasofty writes: Wow i love this colorful pepper!!!
Posted: 2:33 am on May 12th
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
reesefallon writes:
Posted: 5:45 pm on May 21st
TeddyFlyfisher writes: Will Cayenne Pepper sprinkled around my pepper plants, prevent snails from eating the plants...? I live in Thailand and just planted six sweet pepper plants and discovered a snail has eaten one already...Can't use salt as that will destroy the soil...Any advice would be welcomed and thanks...
Posted: 7:45 pm on February 10th
kimms writes: Are the first peppers that form on a pepper plant supposed to be picked before a plant will set anymore peppers?
I've never grown peppers before but this year I decided to give it a shot with one plant. It has always been a healthy plant and is growing in a container. The problem is, it blossomed and set it's first two peppers [which have grown beautifully] but every blossom since has grown when it comes time to turn into a pepper, the stem turns yellow and I find it laying in the soil. The temperatures have been normal, not too hot or cold and moisture stress isn't an issue either. The plant is growing in a large pot with high-quality potting soil, so I doubt it's the soil. I've gone through all my gardening books and I can't find any reason that could be applied to this plant. I don't want to pick the first two peppers prematurely if I don't have to especially if they are going to be the only two that I am going to get from this plant.
Posted: 8:00 am on July 5th
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