Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners is a Great Resource

comments (0) May 7th, 2009

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Ruth Ruth Dobsevage, member
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Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners was created by the Cornell Department of Horticulture.
Speckled Roman tomatoes.
Wapsipinicon Peach tomatoes.
Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners was created by the Cornell Department of Horticulture.Click To Enlarge

Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners was created by the Cornell Department of Horticulture.


I just found a great gardening site and want to share it with everyone: The Cornell Department of Horticulture's Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners.

The site was created as part of a "citizen science" project, where gardeners can find out how more than 5,000 vegetable varieties have performed for other gardeners. It is easy to navigate and packed with useful information.

In posting to the site, you are helping other gardeners make decisions about what to grow. You are also helping researchers by providing data from home gardens, something rarely studied. 

If you register for the site, you can rate and report on vegetable varieties you've grown. You can also limit your search results to plants grown in your state or in your frost-free zone, among other options. A helpful How to use this site page explains how to create a profile and access the information you are looking for.

In addition to the ratings, you'll also find a link to growing guides for everything from artichoke to zucchini. I'm going to consult the eggplant page, so maybe this year I'll have some success for once.

  Wapsipinicon Peach tomatoes   Speckled Roman tomatoes.
  Wapsipinicon Peach (left) and Speckled Roman (right): two unusual tomato varieties.
       
Just to check out the ratings, I looked up Wapsipinicon Peach and Speckled Roman, two tomato varieties I'm growing for the first time this year. I wasn't even sure I'd find them; they are a little off the beaten track, after all. But I did find them, and you'll probably find what you are looking for, too.

So check out the Cornell site, and post your comments below. I'm curious to know what you think.


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