The Blooms in June

comments (14) June 19th, 2016

Pin It

cookinwithherbs susan belsinger, contributor
thumbs up 4 users recommend

The June garden is full of burgeoning baby plants on their way to maturity. It is an exciting time for the gardener with new delights and wonders upon daily inspection. Click on other pix to enlarge and read captions.
Alaska nasturtiums with deep red blooms add lovely color and texture to the garden and the salad bowl, not to mention a delicious pungency. Nasties are in my top five favorite edible blooms.
These pale purple and bright orange blooms are on my blue potato plants; these flowers are not edible.
My first squash of the season in the making--its so exciting! Both flowers and fruits are good to eat.
Daylilies (Hemerocallis spp.) come in hundreds of colors. These beauties stand out in the garden and are crunchy and sweet to eat.
Rocket has been blooming for the past few weeks--I keep cutting back the bloom stalks and enjoy both the greens and flowers in salads, tossed with grains or pasta and on sandwiches and pizza. Tonight it goes in a beet salad with feta and walnuts.
My first calendula flower of the season is just unfurling. These golden petals add color and flavor to salads, rice, butters, baked goods and more. I love these incredible edibles for their skin-soothing properties in a salve or oil.
The pollinators have the lavender patch abuzz all day long. What a delightful fragrance--at once, soothing and uplifting!
The spring broccoli has finished making heads and is now flowering with occasional small side stalks. The blooms and small stalks are tasty in a salad. Or let them set seed and save them.
Dianthus and Sweet William are lovely, delicate, cottage garden flowers. They are pretty floating on a punch or libation, used on confections and they candy well.
Even the yuccas along the driveway are blooming--I didnt plant these--they are volunteers. The flower petals taste a bit like artichokes to me and are great tossed with new peas and shallots in butter until just cooked.
Hurray, though they are little bitty babies, here come the cukes!
The June garden is full of burgeoning baby plants on their way to maturity. It is an exciting time for the gardener with new delights and wonders upon daily inspection. Click on other pix to enlarge and read captions.Click To Enlarge

The June garden is full of burgeoning baby plants on their way to maturity. It is an exciting time for the gardener with new delights and wonders upon daily inspection. Click on other pix to enlarge and read captions.

Photo: Susan Belsinger

Tomorrow is the summer solstice--the longest day of the year--and this date heralds the arrival of summer in full swing. We gardeners are diligently tending our pieces of earth, delighting in each bloom or growth spurt and anxiously awaiting the ripening of our summertime bounty.

Today starts a week of celebration--happy father's day to all of the dads out there! According to the Old Farmer's Almanac, on the morrow, we will have 15 hours and 18 minutes of daylight. Gardeners rejoice!

Appropriately, it is the beginning of National Pollinator Week; nine years ago the U.S. Senate voted unanimously to approve and designate this week-long event every June. The Pollinator Partnership is proud to announce that June 20 to 26, 2016 has been designated National Pollinator Week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of the Interior. http://www.pollinator.org/pollinatorweek/

All of us need to take note that our pollinator populations are declining--and take measures to help maintain and increase them. Without our birds, bees, wasps, butterflies, moths, beetles and bats, we would not have the plants in our gardens. There would be no flowers, fruits and seeds. 

So I am celebrating our hard-working pollinators--as well as the blooms of June--which they are out there busily pollinating! Pictured here are some of my favorite edible flowers; spring greens that are ending their cycles and have sent up their flower stalks to produce seed; and blossoms that are the signs of good things to come like squash, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes and more.

Let us celebrate the summer season, fathers, Mother Earth, flowers, the bugs, birds, and bees and the wonders of nature. What's blooming in your garden?

 


posted in: flowers, pollinators, solstice, blooms, june

Comments (14)

ajayind writes: love it
Posted: 2:06 am on October 1st
Dallinlarsen4 writes: love it
Posted: 3:17 am on September 30th
Dallin_larsen1 writes: i like it
Posted: 2:57 am on September 23rd
Johnychamp writes: love it
Posted: 6:24 am on September 17th
EvaGibbs writes: Beautiful Garden
Posted: 2:26 am on September 17th
DallinLarsen writes: very nice Gardening
Posted: 2:16 am on September 15th
matthewtweedie writes: Great man
Posted: 1:02 am on August 26th
AlexVardy writes: Yes u are write
Posted: 10:55 am on August 16th
erichawkins writes: very inspiring!
Posted: 2:04 am on August 8th
erichawkins writes: Nice Tips...Keep Sharing...
Posted: 1:57 am on August 8th
JessePinkman writes: OSUMM keep it up .. great work
Posted: 10:15 am on August 7th
machirano writes: It looks great,
Posted: 4:39 am on August 7th
irvinmondor writes: cool..
Posted: 5:15 am on July 14th
PromoPeople writes: Cool
Posted: 5:28 pm on June 19th
Log in or create a free account to post a comment.