Grow Your Vegetables Vertically

comments (3) February 24th, 2010

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ChrisMcLaughlin Chris McLaughlin, contributor
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Miniature pumpkins are one of the easiest veggies to grow vertically.
 
Photo by quinn.anya under the Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0.
Youll gain more growing space if you grow some vegetables up.
 
Photo by pdbreen under the Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0.
Miniature pumpkins are one of the easiest veggies to grow vertically.
 
Photo by quinn.anya under the Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0.Click To Enlarge

Miniature pumpkins are one of the easiest veggies to grow vertically.

 

Photo by quinn.anya under the Creative Commons Attribution License 2.0.


Speaking of finding enough space to grow all of the vegetables that you love, its easy to forget about some prime growing real estate that might be right in front of your eyes. We gardeners are usually busy looking at the horizon for growing room.

Today, step into your yard or garden and look up. Look for every possibility to use the vertical space you have at your disposal. Suburban and urbanites usually have vertical growing areas in spades; what with all the fences, walls, and side yards. There are several good reasons for training vegetables to grow up a trellis, lattice, netting, fencing, or obelisk. The first one being the most obvious; it saves growing space and makes the most of the space you have. It also gives that satisfying dimension when height is added to a garden or yard.

One interesting thing you may notice (if you've grown squash vines before) is that when you grow the veggies upwards, the base of the plant becomes full of leaves. Last time you grew them you may have noticed that vines grown horizontally end up with a bare and scraggly base. Suburbanite that I am, I'm always interested in as much botanical eye candy as I can get.

Some veggies enjoy growing up better more others. These vegetables include mini pumpkins, small squash, cucumbers, zucchini, indeterminate tomatoes, peas, and beans. One thing I want to mention is to put whatever support you're going to use into place and then plant the seeds or seedlings against it. This way, you're not literally stepping on anyone's toes by jabbing the support into the ground later.


posted in: growing vegetables vertically, trellises

Comments (3)

Ruth writes: familyguy1957, I wouldn't prune much off determinates. See http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/3721/video-how-to-prune-tomatoes for the indeterminate/determinate pruning distinction and also take a look at http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/6115/video-early-pruning-of-tomato-plants . The second video doesn't differentiate between indeterminates and determinates.
Posted: 10:05 am on March 1st
ChrisMcLaughlin writes: Familyguy1957: I'm not sure if you mean for looks because they get rangy? Or if you're speaking of the suckers. I only cut off lower branches right before I first plant my tomatoes and bury those cut areas so they form more and stronger roots - the plants are truly the better for it.

But if you're wondering about the suckers, I don't worry about them - mostly because I'm too busy. Here's a helpful article on tomato suckers.

http://gardening.about.com/od/totallytomatoes/qt/Tomato_Suckers.htm
Posted: 2:05 pm on February 27th
familyguy1957 writes: I,m new to growing tomatoes seriously. I would like to know if you prune the lower branches off of determinate.
Posted: 12:06 pm on February 27th
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