My 2010 Raised beds garden

comments (2) July 12th, 2010 in Gallery

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Troy_R Troy_R, member
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4 raised beds total.  Tomatos, flowers and peppers in far left bed, center bed is pole beans, sunflowers, and onions. Bed in back is tomatos and cucumbers. Right bed is better seen in next image.
Right bed has watermelons, cantaloupe, tomatillos, 3 varieties of peppers, and carrots.
Here I am putting up wire hangers on my lattice for the watermelons to climb.  The melons do not naturally climb but they are easily trained.
Yep 11 and still growing.  Only one has even begun to show any signs of a head yet.
Cucumbers hanging on the lattice
4 raised beds total.  Tomatos, flowers and peppers in far left bed, center bed is pole beans, sunflowers, and onions. Bed in back is tomatos and cucumbers. Right bed is better seen in next image.Click To Enlarge

4 raised beds total.  Tomatos, flowers and peppers in far left bed, center bed is pole beans, sunflowers, and onions. Bed in back is tomatos and cucumbers. Right bed is better seen in next image.


Here are the current pics of my 2010 garden.  I use concrete block raised beds, filled with 100% compost from local solid waste authority.  In between beds are Black Cedar Mulch.  Not the imitation cedar, the real stuff.  The cheaper hardwood mulch can attract ants, where the cedar tends to drive them away.  So far, the grounds are very clear of insects. I couldn't say that before putting the cedar down though.  In beginning of season ground was just grass and weeds.  Lots of ants coming into early summer.  All seem to be gone now.  If you want to check out any more pics feel free to browse my photo site linked below.


More Information: My Own Design
posted in: Gallery, Raised concrete beds

Comments (2)

amitb writes: rheffner5, you can reduce the cost of construction of the cement block construction by putting down just one layer of blocks to the size that you want. Then, cap the blocks with an AC2 2x8 treated wood frame that has a 1x8 footer board attached to cover the holes in the blocks. For example, a 96" x 64" bed (18 blocks) with this type of construction would cost about $40-45. Works great wherever rainfall or soil moisture is high. Because the frame is not directly on the ground, it lifespan is increased. To protect the larger frame even better, use a 2x4 frame beneath the 2x8. That way, when you need to repair the wood, you will probably only have to replace the 2x4 boards. Using beneficial nematodes to control soil pests will also increase the life cycle of the wood.
Posted: 2:52 pm on November 22nd
rheffner5 writes: I have wanted to try this but was put off by the expense. However my boards supported by stakes don't hold up well in my garden and sag badly after a year or two. How has this held up in the winter? Does freezing soil push the blocks out?
Posted: 9:59 am on February 15th
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